Formal Reading Activities vs. Informal Reading Activities




Formal Reading Activities

Formal Reading Practice


Formal reading activities take place in a setting like a classroom or at home, when student has a goal of practicing and improving at reading. This activity can also include a reading program outside of school where a student might practice reading to improve his or her reading skills. These reading activities are an essential part of learning to read, and are usually facilitated by a teacher, reading specialist, or parent.


Online Formal Reading Practice

Online Reading Practice


These formal reading activities for beginner readers will give readers a chance to participate in the reading activity. By meeting beginner readers where they are at, the reading practice is efficient and effective, and not arduous and draining. To get the most out of the reading activity, have the student point at the words and say the words out loud after the duplicate slide appears. Engagement with the activity in this way will allow the student to work on and improve reading skills. Repeat the activity, and watch word recognition and confidence grow.

These reading videos can be thought of as "training wheels" for beginner readers. Sometimes, it doesn't make sense to do reading activities where the beginner reader will struggle with new words in a story. Repeating the passage on each page will reinforce each word in the passage. For best results, try the videos a few times. Finding a routine and practicing consistently is key. This will allow the student to focus on improving reading skills because he or she will be familiar with the format and technique for the reading activity.

Ipsie & Ito
lil rep ipsie
Caramel
Ipsie & Ito
lil rep ipsie
Cookie
Ipsie & Ito
lil rep ipsie
Box
Eggs
egg reading
Lake
Eggs
egg reading
Hide/Seek
Egg
egg reading
Tree












Informal Reading Activities

Informal Reading Activities


Generally speaking, informal reading activities include any sustained reading activity where the participant or student is reading for enjoyment. This includes reading at bedtime, reading a newspaper, magazine, comic book, or novel for enjoyment. These activities create life-long readers, where the activity of reading is enjoyed from childhood to adulthood. These informal activities usually happen at home, and they can bring a relaxing end to a busy day where the student can sit back and enjoy everything reading has to offer. These types of activities can't be underestimated in the importance of learning how to read because these activities build a healthy foundation that the student can build on.

It might also be helpful to describe what isn't an informal reading activity. When reading informally, the student is not attempting to remember vocabulary words. The student is not looking into a deeper comprehension of the story. The student is not required to answer questions about the story. As you might have guessed, these activities will can be classified as formal reading activities.


Reading Activies: Mix it Up!

Reading Activies: Mix it Up!


There is no doubt that early readers will benefit from both types of reading activities. If a student looks forward to an informal reading activity, it means they are looking forward to reading. In other words, they are reading for enjoyment! This is a major plus for this student because he or she is not opposed to reading. Generally speaking, if your student can receive instruction at school, and enjoy reading at home, this is a nice balance.

This approach to learning how to read doesn't always work for everyone. Sometimes, you may need to mix it up and do some formal exercises at home. When doing formal exercises at home, it is important to keep things light and relaxed. Instead of pressuring the reader and correcting mistakes, make a routine where the child can practice reading with the videos for a week or two. Try to point out the things the reader is doing well. With persistence and active participation, the reader will begin to make progress. Also, keep the practice sessions short. Short reading practice benefits beginner readers, and an intense session with full attention for 5 minutes might be more beneficial than 20 minutes of passive observation.




Reading Activity Examples

Reading Activity Examples for Children


These online reading practice activities are repeatable and you can do many formal and informal activities around them. If you are a parent or teacher looking for reading activities for struggling readers, these videos allow the student to participate without having to sound out every word in the story. The more the student participates, the better, so have the student say the words aloud while he or she points at them. Give a short quiz at the end, or have the student write about "what happens next." You can even make your own reading video!

Online Reading Practice for Kids     Reading Practice 1     Reading Practice 2     Reading Practice 3





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